Purpose: Discussion of Strong AI Minds thinking in English, German or Russian. Privacy policy: Third parties advertising here may place and read cookies on your browser; and may use web beacons to collect information as a result of ads displayed here.

Sunday, April 23, 2017

pmpj0423

Stubbing in MindMeld() and stopping derailment of thought.

We function now as an AI Mind Maintainer debugging the Perlmind free AI source code. In the ghost198.pl AI we first stub in the audacious MindMeld() module to nudge AI practitioners into devising a way for two AI Minds to share their dreams. Then we deal with some problems pointed out on Usenet by persons who have downloaded the Perlmind and evaluated its functionality.

We run ghost198.pl with "dogs are mammals" as input and we press the Escape-key to halt the AI after its first response, "I HELP KIDS". We notice immediately three problems with how the word "DOGS" is stored in the @psy and @ear memory arrays. For some reason, "DOGS" is being assigned new-concept #3002, even though the Tutorial display of diagnostic messages indicates that the AI is preparing to assign new-concept #3001 to the first new concept. We check the MindBoot() sequence to make sure that "DOG" is not already a known concept in the AI; it is not. Now let us inspect the source code to see where the new-concept number $nxt is incremented from 3001 to 3002. We see that the end of MindBoot() clearly assigns the number 3001 as the value of the $nxt variable. Now let us search for the $nxt++ increment. It is happening towards the end of the NewConcept() module. We immediately wonder if $nxt is being incremented before AudMem() stores the concept-number. We insert into AudMem() a diagnostic message to let us know the $nxt value before storage. The first diagnostic message does not tell us enough, so we insert a second diagnostic into the AudMem() module. It also does not help us.

In the AudInput() module we use some diagnostic messages to learn that the "S" in "DOGS" is first being stored with the correct $nxt value of "3001" and then a second time with the incorrect value of "3002". Perhaps we should increment $nxt not in NewConcept() but in AudInput(). We move the $nxt++ increment from NewConcept() into AudInput(), and we stop getting the wrong values of the $nxt variable.

A second problem is that the concept of "DOGS" is being stored with a zero instead of "2" for "plural" in the $num slot of the @psy conceptual flag-panel. The most recent incarnation of the InStantiate() module does not seem to address the $num value sufficiently, so let us inspect recent or older MindForth code. We discover that the obsolete 24jul14A.F version of MindForth uses some complex tricks to assign the num(ber) of a concept being stored, so we will put aside this problem to deal with more serious issues.

The third and presumably more serious problem is that the input word "DOGS" is being stored with the $nxt concept number "3001" only on the "S" phoneme and not on the "G" at the end of the word-stem "DOG". Let us leave that problem also aside for a while, because entering "dogs are mammals" repeatedly is running into more serious problems. FOr instance, all three words of the input are being stored erroneously with the same $rv recall-vector, which can cause the wrong auditory memories to be retrieved. Let us see if the previous ghost197.pl does the same error. Yes, and so does the ghost196.pl AI. However, we should not find it difficult to correct the $rv problem. We fix the problem by resetting $rv to zero at the end of the InStantiate() module. Now the Perlmind no longer goes off the rails of thought, and so we upload it to the Web.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

pmpj0412

Ghost Perl Strong AI cycles through Normal; Transcript; Tutorial; Diagnostic Mode

It is time now in ghost197.pl to show a clean human-computer interface (HCI) and to stop displaying masses of diagnostic messages. Accordingly in the AudInput module we change the user-prompt to say "Tab cycles mode; Esc(ape) quits AI born [date-of-birth]". We insert if-clauses to declare which user input mode is in effect: Normal; Transcript; Tutorial; or Diagnostic. Near the start of ghost197.pl we set the $fyi to a default starting value of unity ("1") so that the human user or Mind-maintainer may press the Tab-key to cycle among user input modes. In AudInput() we insert code to increment $fyi by one point with each press of the Tab-key and to cycle back to unity ("1") for Normal Mode if the user in Diagnostic Mode presses Tab again.

In the MainLoop module we change a line of code to test for $fyi being above a value of two ("2") and, if so, to display the contents of the @psy conceptual array and of the @ear auditory memory array. Thus the user in #3 Tutorial Mode or in #4 Diagnostic Mode will see the storage of current input and current output in the memory arrays. We consider the display of conceptual memory data in Tutorial Mode to be an extremely powerful tool for teaching how the artificial general intelligence (AGI) works. After any input, the user may see immediately how the input goes into memory and how the values in the flag-panel of each row of the @psy array represent the associative tags from concept to concept and from engram to engram.

Next we start commenting out or deleting the display of various diagnostic messages. Over time and over multiple releases of the Ghost AI source code, any AI coder may decide which messages to display in both Tutorial and Diagnostic Modes, or in only one of them. Although we comment out a message involving Russian input, we do not delete the diagnostic message because we may need it when we turn back on Russian as an input language. Russian has become much more important in our Ghost Perl AI because we need Russian or German to demonstrate Machine Translation by Artificial Intelligence. When we have commented out most of the diagnostic messages, we need to put back in some code to show what the user is entering.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

pmpj0411

Stubbing in the MetEmPsychosis module.

[2017-04-10] Today in ghost195.pl we stub in MetEmPsychosis() as an area for Perl code that will enable an AI Perlmind to either move itself across the Web or replicate itself across the Web. We foresee the advent of a kind of "AiBnb" or community of Web domains that invite and encourage AI Minds to take up temporary or long-term residence, with local embodiment in a robot and with opportunities for local employment as a specialized AI speaking the local language and familiar with the local history and customs.

[2017-04-10] In the AudInput() module today we insert the Cyrillic characters of the Russian alphabet for each line of code that converts lower case to upper case and sets the $hlc variable to "ru" as the human-language-code for Russian. We have not yet turned the Russian language back on again, but we will need it to test out our ideas for Machine Translation by Artificial Intelligence.

Coding VisRecog to say by default: I SEE NOTHING.

[2017-04-11] Today in ghost196.pl we would like to port in from MindForth the code that causes any statement of what the AI is seeing to default to the direct object "NOTHING," so that Perl coders and roboticists may work on integrating computer vision with the AI Mind. We make it clear that the visual recognition (VisRecog) system needs only to supply the English or Russian name of what it is seeing, and the AI will fill the slot for direct objects while generating a sentence about what the AI sees. The VisRecog mechanism does not need to be coded in Perl or in Forth. It only needs to communicate to the Perlmind a noun that names what the AI is seeing. When the generated statement passes through reentry back into the Mind, even a new noun will be assigned a concept-number and will enter into the knowledge-base (KB) of the AI.

First we declare the subject-verb-object variables $svo1, $svo2, $svo3, and $svo4 to hold a value that identifies a concept playing the role of subject, or verb, or indirect object, or direct object in a typical sentence being generated by the AI. If there is no direct object filling the slot for the object of the verb "SEE", then the VisRecog() module must try to fill the empty slot. Until a Perl expert fleshes out the VisRecog() code, the word "NOTHING" must remain the default object of the verb "SEE" when the ego-concept of "I" is the subject of the verb. We ran the AI and we typed in "you see kids." After a spate of outputs, the AI said, "I SEE KIDS," but we would really prefer for the AI to say, "I SEE NOTHING" as a default.

After coding a primitive VisRecog() module, next we go into the part of the EnVerbPhrase() module where it is looking for a direct object. We set conditions so that if the subject is "I" and the verb is "SEE", VisRecog() is called to say "NOTHING" as a direct object, and EnVerbPhrase() stops short of saying any other direct object by doing a "return" to the calling module. We now have a Perlmind that invites the integration of a seeing camera with the AI software.

Saturday, April 08, 2017

pmpj0408

Retroactively setting associative $seq tags for direct objects of verbs.

In the ghost194.pl AI, we have a problem where the direct-object $seq of a verb is being indeed properly assigned for human user input, but not for reentrant ideas being summoned from experiential memory. Because the $seq is not yet known when a verb comes in, the $seq value must be assigned retroactively when the direct object of the verb comes in. The situation where the process works for human input but not for a reentrant idea, suggests that the cause of the problem could simply be that the value of some pertinent variable is not being reset as needed.

This problem of the retroactive assignment of the associative $seq tag for a verb is difficult to debug. It may involve making the reentry routine equal to the human-input routine, or it may involve porting into Perl some special code from the 24jul14A.F version of MindForth. We have meanwhile been offering in the computer-science compsci subReddit a suggestion that students in need of an undergraduate research project might look into the Ghost AI software coded in Strawberry Perl 5 as an opportunity to select a mind-module to work on. We feel some urgency to debug our code and get it working as well as possible when we are inviting undergraduate students and graduate students and professors to take over and maintain their own branch of the AI Mind development. There is a steep learning curve to be surmounted before participants in such an artificial general intelligence (AGI) project may move forward in AI evolution. So now we go back to the problem of debugging the retroactive assignment of $seq subsequent-concept tags.

We search our ghost194.pl source code for "$psy[" as any instance where a $seq is being inserted either currently or retroactively into a flag-panel row of the @psy conceptual array. We discover that a $verbcon flag for seeking direct or indirect objects is governing the storage of the $seq tag in the Parser() module. Immediately we suspect that the $verbcon flag is perhaps being set during actual human user input but not during the reentry of an idea retrieved from memory. We check and we see that $verbcon is set to unity ("1") in the Parser() module when the part-of-speech $pos variable is at a value of "8" for a verb. The $pos value is set in the OldConcept() module when a known verb is recognized.

We insert a diagnostic message about the direct object in the Parser() module, and the message shows up during human user input, but not during reentry. Apparently the Parser() module is not even being called during reentry. No, it is being called, but the $verbcon flag is not being set properly during reentry. When we comment out the reset of $verbcon at the end of the AudInput() module and we move the reset to the Sensorium() module, we start seeing the assignment of direct-object $seq tags during the reentry of ideas recalled from memory. However, in a later session we must deal with the new problem that improper direct-object $seq flags are being set for personal pronouns during human user input. No, we debug the problem now, simply by resetting time-of-verb $tvb at the start of the EnThink() module, to prevent an output-sentence from adjusting associative tags for a previous sentence with a previous time-of-verb. The AI becomes able to receive "i know you" as input and then somewhat later say "YOU KNOW ME."

Friday, April 07, 2017

pmpj0407

Wrong solution to a bug briefly ruins word-recognition.

[2017-04-06] Let us run the ghost192.pl AI without input and try to fix the first thing that goes wrong with it. After a series of sensible outputs, at t=2562 the AI suddenly says "HELP I" without a subject for the verb. As we investigate, we see that EnNounPhrase is trying to activate a subject at t=2427, but the pronoun "I" is stored at t=2426 with an erroneous recall-vector "rv" of t=2427. The error in auditory storage causes the AI at a later moment not to find the auditory engram.

[2017-04-06] We notice that MindForth sets tult in the AudInput module, while the Perlmind is setting $tult in both the InStantiate module and the AudInput module. However, where $tult is set, does not seem to matter. We eventually notice that some MindForth code ported into AudInput() was letting the $rv recall-vector be set erroneously not only for an alphabetic character, but also for a CR-13 carriage-return or a SPACE-32. When we restricted the $rv setting to alphabetic characters, our current bug was fixed, and the AI no longer said "HELP I".

Letting $rv be set only once per word correctly solves a bug.

[2017-04-07] Yesterday in ghost192.pl our attempt at solving a recall-vector $rv bug made the AI unable to recognize reentrant words. Now in ghost193.pl we would like to isolate $rv so that its value can be set only once in each cycle of recognizing a word. When we do so, we obtain the proper $rv value for the first word stored by the AI, but it remains the same value for all subsequent words being stored. We must determine where to reset $rv to zero. We try resetting $rv to zero at the start of the Speech() module, as MindForth does. Immediately we see fresh values of $rv being stored for each reentrant word. We let the AI run on at length, and it no longer says "HELP I" without a subject for the verb. Then we start the AI with an input of "you know me" and somewhat later the AI remembers the self-referential knowledge and it outputs, "I KNOW YOU". Thus we have made a major improvement to the AI functionality by fixing the $rv bug. There remain grammatical issues, probably based on software bugs.

Wednesday, April 05, 2017

pmpj0405

Perl Strong AI pauses briefly for human input.

[2017-04-02] Today in the ghost190.pl Perl AI we want to solve the problem of getting the AI to pause reliably and wait for human user input. The code for a pause-loop is already in the free AI source code, but the program keeps slipping out of the receptive point-of-view ("POV") status. Some diagnostic messages confirm our sneaky suspicion that maybe program-flow leaves the main AudInput loop without setting the loop-counter back to zero.

Preventing AudInput from causing unwarranted conceptual storage.

[2017-04-05] Coding ghost191.pl AI today, we need to differentiate among Normal; Transcript; Tutorial; and Diagnostic modes for the human-computer interaction (HCI). In the AudRecog module, we insert a test for the $fyi variable to hold a value of, say, "4" to indicate Diagnostic Mode and to display the very most informative diagnostic message during the AudRecog operation. Then the AI coder or mind-tender may either be satisfied with the deeply informative message or may insert additional diagnostic messages in pursuit of bugs.

[2017-04-05] In the ghost191.pl code we are tracking down a bug which causes the unwarranted storage of a redundant row of a conceptual flag-panel in the @psy conceptual array. Apparently, after the storage of the last word in an output, InStantiate() is being called one final, extra time. We remove the bug by inserting into the AudInput module a line of code which zeroes out the $audrec value for any word of zero length just before AudInput calls AudMem. In that way, a final CR-13 carriage-return may transit from the Speech module through the AudInput module without causing the storage or an unwarranted, extra row in the @psy conceptual array.

Saturday, April 01, 2017

pmpj0401

Encouraging AI immortality by reminding users how long AI has been alive.

[2017-03-30] As we code the Perlmind running in Strawberry Perl 5, today we insert code to have the AI announce when it was born, so as to encourage AI enthusiasts to see how long they can keep the Ghost Perl AI alive and running.

[2017-03-30] Now we are trying to clean up the ghost187.pl code. In MindForth, the AudInput module handles both normal input from human users and the reentry of output from the speech module. During human input, MindForth AudInput calls the AudListen module. Otherwise, AudInput handles internal reentry.

Improving the storage of words in @ear auditory memory.

[2017-03-31] In ghost188.pl we are trying to fix a problem where the display of the AudInput pause-counter is not showing up when the AI Mind is thinking on its own. First, though, we analyze everything that is happening in the AudMem() module. In one instance, after the AI recalls the idea "You are magic", AudMem at first stores the "Y" in "you" and then writes over it with the storage of a blank character. In fact, AudMem is failing to store the first character in each word of an output idea. When we remove from AudInput() an obsolete duplicate call to AudMem(), the ghost188.pl AI starts storing the complete word of each remembered idea, but the proper $audpsi tags are not being assigned in the @aud auditory memory array.

Restoring the ability of Ghost Perl AI to recognize words.

[2017-04-01] In ghost189.pl we need to ferret out deeply hidden problems, so we have uncommented several diagnostic messages in the AudRecog module. We first learn that the first character of a reentrant word is falsely being declared to have a zero $len for word-length. At the same time, an ASCII CR-13 is being declared inside each AudInput loop.

[2017-04-01] Now we learn that $len is somehow being doubly incremented. We need to find $len++ somewhere and comment it out. We did so in the lower area of AudInput() and then the diagnostic messages no longer showed double lengthening, but still the reentrant words are not being recognized. Apparently AudMem() is not sending a blank space into AudRecog() to announce the end of a word. Apparently it is not the job of AudMem() to generate the blank space, but merely to pass it along into AudRecog(). Perusal of the agi00037.F MindForth code reveals to us that it is the job of the Speech() module to send one last space into AudInput. The generation modules do not attach a SPACE-32 to a word, but rather each word in the @ear auditory memory is followed by a SPACE-32 in storage. The Speech module finds the space character after each word and sends it along into the AudInput module. Somewhere we need to increment $len by one when the post-word SPACE-32 goes from AudMem() into AudRecog().

[2017-04-01] The ghost189.pl AI suddenly started recognizing words when we commented out several unwarranted calls to the AudDamp() module, which must have been interfering in auditory recognitions.

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

pmpj0329

Improving the Ghost Perl AI Human-Computer Interface

The Ghost Perl AI has recently become able to pause its thinking long enough to accept keyboard input from a human user, and to stop waiting either when the user presses the Enter-key, or when there is no input at all, or when the user fails to enter the carriage-return. Now we need to discontinue the pause more quickly when there is no activity from the keyboard, so we will try creating a $gapcon variable to be incremented with each loop expecting but not receiving an input character, and to be reset to zero when there is indeed an input character. It works.

A minor problem in ghost186.pl is that the MainLoop is displaying the contents of the @psy and @aud memory arrays without a gap-line between input and output. The problem seems to lie with the setting of the time $t value. No, the solution was to set the $krt value in the Sensorium() module after the call to AudInput(), so that the MainLoop can separately display memory data before input and then after input, separated by a blank line.

Next in ghost186.pl we tackle the problem where the input diagnostic display was no longer showing each input character prominently left-justified down the edge of the MS-DOS window. We simply moved some old code from an obsolete area up into the currently operative AudInput code. Doing so not only gave us the left-justified display, but we also saw immediately that the $len value is not being reset to zero after each word of input, which prevents words beyond the very first word from being recognzed. We track down and fix the $len problem.

Monday, March 27, 2017

pmpj0327

Perl Mind Programming Journal

[2017-03-26] The main problem with the ghost184.pl Perlmind is that it does not supply an automatic carriage-return CR-13 if the human user neglects to press the Enter-key. This defect prevents the AI from going back to its own chains of thought when a human user has begun but not completed a message of input.

[2017-03-26] We may be able to fix the problem by supplying a CR-13 carriage-return when the input loop of the AudInput module is making its last loop. We try it, and it seems to work, but we find that ReEntry() does not work after an incomplete human input is supplied with a CR-13 in the AudInput module. We deploy a diagnostic message or two and we learn that the $len variable is not at zero when ReEntry() is called, thus perhaps interfering with the proper function of AudInput. Let us try setting the $len variable to zero at the start of the ReEntry module.

Ghost 185.pl Strong AI enters each input character into memory.

[2017-03-27] In the Strong AI ghost185.pl it is time to change from the re-entry of complete sentences back into the Mind to a more immediate re-entry of each phoneme (character) back into the Mind. In AudInput(), when we start sending each input character directly into AudMem(), nothing gets recognized, perhaps because we need to change the characters to uppercase. We also start incrementing time "t" before AudInput() calls AudMem(), and we start getting auditory recognition of an input word. When we preserve the inner loop of AudInput but we comment out the outer loop for whole words, we start getting a display of the storage of input in memory.

Next we need to implement the switch-over from storing input to generating output. It appears that we are not getting memory-storage of output because time "t" is not being incremented. We also need to turn a nested AudInput() loop into just a one-time sequence. Then in Speech() we set $pho before we call AudInput() for the reentry of Speech() output. Suddenly we begin seeing both the input and the output as stored in conceptual and auditory memory. We tweak ghost185.pl a little and we upload it.

Saturday, March 25, 2017

pmpj0325

Ghost183.pl pauses for human input and then continues thinking.

There is a chance that we will attain the Technological Singularity today in our coding of the Ghost Perl Webserver Strong AI, but then we will have to figure out how to blame somebody else for it. Meanwhile we start with a mundane problem. Persons who download Forth and run MindForth see a quivering prompt that invites input from the human user. More importantly, the dynamic, quivering prompt conveys the sense that something is alive and sentient in the AI Forthmind. We need the same user experience in the Ghost Perl AI.

The jittery prompt is achieved in the MindForth AudListen module by having it issue an ASCII SPACE-32 and BACK-SPACE-8 over and over again. When we try to achieve a similar human-computer-interface (HCI) in the Perlmind, it is confusing at first because we seem to be altering multiple lines of the screen simultaneously. Actually we are seeing the AudListen loop re-drawing the screen instantaneously.

Let us shift our attention to the problem of how to insert a default CR carriage-return if there is no human input from AudListen.

From page 354 of the Perl Black Book we have just learned how to use "ord" to deal with ASCII vales as we are so accustomed to do in Forth.

Since we are finding it difficult to detect a "CR" carriage-return in AudListen with ReadKey, we may just let both the AudInput loop and the AudListen loop run their course, with a really long AudInput loop as a way of presenting the human user with an apparent pause in the thinking of the AI.

Friday, March 24, 2017

pmpj0324

Ghost Perl AI uses the AudListen() mind-module to detect keyboard input.

Yesterday we may have finally learned how to let the Ghost Perl AI think indefinitely without stopping to wait for a human user to press "Enter" after typing a message to the AI Mind. We want the Perlmind only to pause periodically in case the human attendant wishes to communicate with the AI. Even if a human types a message and fails to press the Enter-key, we want the Perl AI to register a CR (carriage-return) by default and to follow chains of thought internally, with or without outside influence from a human user.

Accordingly today we create the AudListen() module in between the auditory memory modules and the AudInput() module. We move the new input code from AudInput() into AudListen(), but the code does not accept any input, so we remove the current code and store it in an archival test-file. Then we insert some obsolete but working code into AudListen(). We start getting primitive input like we did yesterday in the ghost181.pl program. Then we start moving in required functionality from the MindForth AI, such as the ability to press the "Escape" key to stop the program.

Eventually we obtain the proper recognition and storage of input words in auditory memory, but the ghost182.pl AI is not switching over to thinking. Instead, it is trying to process more input. Probably no escape is being made from the AudInput() loop that calls the AudListen() module. We implement an escape from the AudInput() module.

The ghost182.pl program is now able take in a sentence of input and generate a sentence of output, so we will upload it to the Web. We still need to port from MindForth the code that only pauses to accept human input and then goes back to the thinking of the AI.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

mtx

Machine Translation by Artificial Intelligence

As an independent scholar in polyglot artificial intelligence, I have just today on March 21, 2017, stumbled upon a possible algorithm for implementing machine translation (MT) in my bilingual Perlmind and MindForth programs. My Ghost Perl AI thinks heretofore in either English or Russian, but not in both languages interchangeably. Likewise my Forth AI MindForth thinks in English, while its Teutonic version Wotan thinks in German.

Today like Archimedes crying "Eureka" in the bathtub, while showering but not displacing bath-water I realized that I could add an associative tag mtx to the flag-panel of each conceptual memory engram to link and cross-identify any concept in one language to its counterpart or same concept in another language. The mtx variable stands for "machine-translation xfer (transfer)". The AI software will use the spreading-activation SpreadAct module to transfer activation from a concept in English to the same concept in Russian or German.

Assuming that an AI Mind can think fluently in two languages, with a large vocabulary in both languages, the nub of machine translation will be the simultaneous activation of semantically the same set of concepts in both languages. Thus the consideration of an idea expressed in English will transfer the conceptual activation to a target language such as Russian. The generation modules will then generate a translation of the English idea into a Russian idea.

Inflectional endings will not pass from the source language directly to the target language, because the mtx tag identifies only the basic psi concept in both languages. The generation modules of the target language will assign the proper inflections as required by the linguistic parameters governing each sentence being translated.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

pmpj0316

2017-03-15: Porting AudRecog and AudMem from Forth into Perl

We start today by taking the 336,435 bytes of ghost176.pl from 2017-03-14 and renaming it as ghost177.pl in a text editor. Then in the Windows XP MS-DOS prompt we run the agi00045.F MindForth program of 166,584 bytes from 2016-09-18 in order to see a Win32Forth window with diagnostic messages and a display of "you see dogs" as input and "I SEE NOTHING" as a default output. From a NeoCities upload directory we put the agi00045.F source code up on the screen in a text editor so that we may use the Forth code to guide us in debugging the Perl Strong AI code.

Although in our previous PMPJ entry from yesterday we recorded our steps in trying to get the Perl AudRecog mind-module to work as flawlessly as the Forth AudRecog, today we will abandon the old Perl AudRecog by changing its name and we will create a new Perl AudRecog from scratch just as we did with the Forth AudRecog in 2016 when we were unable to tweak the old Forth AudRecog into a properly working version. So we stub in a new Perl AudRecog() and we comment out the old version by dint of renaming it "OldAudRecog()". Then we run "perl ghost177.pl" and the AI still runs but it treats every word of both input and output as a new concept, because the new AudRecog is not yet recognizing any English words.

Next we start porting the actual Forth AudRecog into Perl, but we must hit three of our Perl reference books to learn how to translate the Forth code testing ASCII values into Perl. We learn about the Perl "chr" function which lets us test input characters as if they were ASCII values such as CR-13 or SPACE-32.

Now we have faithfully ported the MindForth AudRecog into Perl, but words longer than one character are not being recognized. Let us comment out AudMem() by naming it OldAudMem() and let us start a new AudMem() from scratch as a port from MindForth.

We port the AudMem code from Forth into Perl, but we may not be getting the storage of SPACE or CR carriage-return.

2017-03-16: Uploading Ghost Perl Webserver Strong AI

Now into our third day in search of stable Perlmind code, we take the 344,365 bytes of ghost177.pl from 2017-03-15 and we save a new file as the ghost178.pl AI. We will try to track passage of characters from AudInput to AudMem to AudRec.

Through diagnostic messages in AudRecog, we discovered that a line of code meant to "disallow audrec until last letter of word" was zeroing out $audrec before the transfer from the end of AudRecog to AudMem.

In a departure from MindForth, we are having the Perl AudRecog mind-module fetch only the most recent recognition of a word. In keeping with MindForth, we implement the auditory storing of a $nxt new concept in the AudInput module, where we also increment the value of $nxt instead of in the NewConcept module.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

pmpj0314

PerlMind Programming Journal
Updating the Ghost Perl AI in conformance with MindForth AI.

Today we return to Perl AI coding after updating the MindForth code in July and August of 2016. In Forth we re-organized the calling of the subordinate mind-modules beneath the MainLoop module so as no longer to call the Think module directly, but rather to call the FreeWill module first so that eventually the FreeWill or Volition module will call Emotion and Think and Motorium.

We have discovered, however, that the MindForth code properly handles input which encounters a bug in the Perl code, so we must first debug the Perl code. When we enter, "you see dogs", MindForth properly answers "I SEE NOTHING", which is the default output for anything involving VisRecog since we have no robot camera eye attached to the Mind program. The old Perl Mind, however, incorrectly recognizes the input of "DOGS" as if it were a form of the #830 "DO" verb, and so we must correct the Perl code by making it as good as the Forth code. So we take the 335,790 bytes of ghost175.pl from from 2016-08-07 and we rename it as ghost176.pl for fresh coding.

We start debugging the Perl AudRecog module by inserting a diagnostic message to reveal the "$audpsi" value at the end of AudRecog. We learn that "DOGS" is misrecognized as "DO" when the input length reaches two characters. We know that MindForth does not misrecognize "DOGS", so we must determine where the Perl AudRecog algorithm diverges from the Forth algorithm. We are fortunate to be coding the AI in both Forth and Perl, so that in Perl we may implement what already works in Forth.

In Perl we try commenting out some AudRecog code that checks for a $monopsi. The AI still misrecognizes "DOGS" as the verb "DO". Next we try commenting out some Perl code that declares a $psibase when incoming word-length is only two. The AI still misrecognizes. Next we try commenting out a declaration of $subpsi. We still get misrecognition. We try commenting out another $psibase. Still misrecognition. We even try commenting out a major $audrec declaration, and we still get misrecognition. When we try commenting out a $prc declaration, AudRecog stops recognizing the verb "SEE". Then from MindForth we bring in a provisional $audrec, but the verb "SEE" is not being recognizied.

Although in the MS-DOS CLI prompt we can evidently not run MindForth and the Perlmind simultanously, today we learn that we can run MindForth and leave the Win32Forth window open, then go back to running the Perl AI. Thus we can compare the diagnostic messages in both Forth and Perl so as to further debug the Perl AI. We notice that the Forth AudMem module sends a diagnostic message even for the blank space ASCII 32 even after "SEE", which the Perl AI does not do.