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Wednesday, April 12, 2017

pmpj0412

Ghost Perl Strong AI cycles through Normal; Transcript; Tutorial; Diagnostic Mode

It is time now in ghost197.pl to show a clean human-computer interface (HCI) and to stop displaying masses of diagnostic messages. Accordingly in the AudInput module we change the user-prompt to say "Tab cycles mode; Esc(ape) quits AI born [date-of-birth]". We insert if-clauses to declare which user input mode is in effect: Normal; Transcript; Tutorial; or Diagnostic. Near the start of ghost197.pl we set the $fyi to a default starting value of unity ("1") so that the human user or Mind-maintainer may press the Tab-key to cycle among user input modes. In AudInput() we insert code to increment $fyi by one point with each press of the Tab-key and to cycle back to unity ("1") for Normal Mode if the user in Diagnostic Mode presses Tab again.

In the MainLoop module we change a line of code to test for $fyi being above a value of two ("2") and, if so, to display the contents of the @psy conceptual array and of the @ear auditory memory array. Thus the user in #3 Tutorial Mode or in #4 Diagnostic Mode will see the storage of current input and current output in the memory arrays. We consider the display of conceptual memory data in Tutorial Mode to be an extremely powerful tool for teaching how the artificial general intelligence (AGI) works. After any input, the user may see immediately how the input goes into memory and how the values in the flag-panel of each row of the @psy array represent the associative tags from concept to concept and from engram to engram.

Next we start commenting out or deleting the display of various diagnostic messages. Over time and over multiple releases of the Ghost AI source code, any AI coder may decide which messages to display in both Tutorial and Diagnostic Modes, or in only one of them. Although we comment out a message involving Russian input, we do not delete the diagnostic message because we may need it when we turn back on Russian as an input language. Russian has become much more important in our Ghost Perl AI because we need Russian or German to demonstrate Machine Translation by Artificial Intelligence. When we have commented out most of the diagnostic messages, we need to put back in some code to show what the user is entering.