Purpose: Discussion of Strong AI Minds thinking in English, German or Russian. Privacy policy: Third parties advertising here may place and read cookies on your browser; and may use web beacons to collect information as a result of ads displayed here.

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

pmpj0411

Stubbing in the MetEmPsychosis module.

[2017-04-10] Today in ghost195.pl we stub in MetEmPsychosis() as an area for Perl code that will enable an AI Perlmind to either move itself across the Web or replicate itself across the Web. We foresee the advent of a kind of "AiBnb" or community of Web domains that invite and encourage AI Minds to take up temporary or long-term residence, with local embodiment in a robot and with opportunities for local employment as a specialized AI speaking the local language and familiar with the local history and customs.

[2017-04-10] In the AudInput() module today we insert the Cyrillic characters of the Russian alphabet for each line of code that converts lower case to upper case and sets the $hlc variable to "ru" as the human-language-code for Russian. We have not yet turned the Russian language back on again, but we will need it to test out our ideas for Machine Translation by Artificial Intelligence.

Coding VisRecog to say by default: I SEE NOTHING.

[2017-04-11] Today in ghost196.pl we would like to port in from MindForth the code that causes any statement of what the AI is seeing to default to the direct object "NOTHING," so that Perl coders and roboticists may work on integrating computer vision with the AI Mind. We make it clear that the visual recognition (VisRecog) system needs only to supply the English or Russian name of what it is seeing, and the AI will fill the slot for direct objects while generating a sentence about what the AI sees. The VisRecog mechanism does not need to be coded in Perl or in Forth. It only needs to communicate to the Perlmind a noun that names what the AI is seeing. When the generated statement passes through reentry back into the Mind, even a new noun will be assigned a concept-number and will enter into the knowledge-base (KB) of the AI.

First we declare the subject-verb-object variables $svo1, $svo2, $svo3, and $svo4 to hold a value that identifies a concept playing the role of subject, or verb, or indirect object, or direct object in a typical sentence being generated by the AI. If there is no direct object filling the slot for the object of the verb "SEE", then the VisRecog() module must try to fill the empty slot. Until a Perl expert fleshes out the VisRecog() code, the word "NOTHING" must remain the default object of the verb "SEE" when the ego-concept of "I" is the subject of the verb. We ran the AI and we typed in "you see kids." After a spate of outputs, the AI said, "I SEE KIDS," but we would really prefer for the AI to say, "I SEE NOTHING" as a default.

After coding a primitive VisRecog() module, next we go into the part of the EnVerbPhrase() module where it is looking for a direct object. We set conditions so that if the subject is "I" and the verb is "SEE", VisRecog() is called to say "NOTHING" as a direct object, and EnVerbPhrase() stops short of saying any other direct object by doing a "return" to the calling module. We now have a Perlmind that invites the integration of a seeing camera with the AI software.