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Thursday, March 16, 2017

pmpj0316

2017-03-15: Porting AudRecog and AudMem from Forth into Perl

We start today by taking the 336,435 bytes of ghost176.pl from 2017-03-14 and renaming it as ghost177.pl in a text editor. Then in the Windows XP MS-DOS prompt we run the agi00045.F MindForth program of 166,584 bytes from 2016-09-18 in order to see a Win32Forth window with diagnostic messages and a display of "you see dogs" as input and "I SEE NOTHING" as a default output. From a NeoCities upload directory we put the agi00045.F source code up on the screen in a text editor so that we may use the Forth code to guide us in debugging the Perl Strong AI code.

Although in our previous PMPJ entry from yesterday we recorded our steps in trying to get the Perl AudRecog mind-module to work as flawlessly as the Forth AudRecog, today we will abandon the old Perl AudRecog by changing its name and we will create a new Perl AudRecog from scratch just as we did with the Forth AudRecog in 2016 when we were unable to tweak the old Forth AudRecog into a properly working version. So we stub in a new Perl AudRecog() and we comment out the old version by dint of renaming it "OldAudRecog()". Then we run "perl ghost177.pl" and the AI still runs but it treats every word of both input and output as a new concept, because the new AudRecog is not yet recognizing any English words.

Next we start porting the actual Forth AudRecog into Perl, but we must hit three of our Perl reference books to learn how to translate the Forth code testing ASCII values into Perl. We learn about the Perl "chr" function which lets us test input characters as if they were ASCII values such as CR-13 or SPACE-32.

Now we have faithfully ported the MindForth AudRecog into Perl, but words longer than one character are not being recognized. Let us comment out AudMem() by naming it OldAudMem() and let us start a new AudMem() from scratch as a port from MindForth.

We port the AudMem code from Forth into Perl, but we may not be getting the storage of SPACE or CR carriage-return.

2017-03-16: Uploading Ghost Perl Webserver Strong AI

Now into our third day in search of stable Perlmind code, we take the 344,365 bytes of ghost177.pl from 2017-03-15 and we save a new file as the ghost178.pl AI. We will try to track passage of characters from AudInput to AudMem to AudRec.

Through diagnostic messages in AudRecog, we discovered that a line of code meant to "disallow audrec until last letter of word" was zeroing out $audrec before the transfer from the end of AudRecog to AudMem.

In a departure from MindForth, we are having the Perl AudRecog mind-module fetch only the most recent recognition of a word. In keeping with MindForth, we implement the auditory storing of a $nxt new concept in the AudInput module, where we also increment the value of $nxt instead of in the NewConcept module.